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278542 Richard Wilson <yorkshireman@y...> 2024‑06‑18 Re: [Sender Not Verified] Purchased this saw
How reassuring - thanks 

The ‘Big Thing’ from all this is that the entire ‘assembly’ of a 3 point tooth
is considered much as a single tooth set in another pattern.  I have a gorgeous,
unused almost, perforated lance crosscut, and each group of 4 points includes a
left, a right, and the two bounding rakers.  Makes it much more obviously like a
panel saw cross cut, where alternating left/right teeth can be seen to sever
fibres.

You have to think bigger with a long saw, and think bigger as regards what you
are cutting.  Can’t saw inch thick timber with a lance pattern saw, nor a ten
inch tree stem with a 10 point panel saw.

(Though one of the aforesaid volunteers also turned up with his own saw - about
a 28” panel saw, hard point, with which he abused many branches, deciding he
liked ‘his’ saw better than the provided green wood bow saws provided.  A whole
lot of effort went into what was a dozen strokes for some of us. I was amazed he
could keep it moving in green growing timber.  Still - it’s cheaper than a gym.




Richard Wilson
yorkshireman Galoot in Northumbria



> On 18 Jun 2024, at 20:27, Kirk Eppler  wrote:
> 
> Here is confirmation of what you did being correct, per the US Dept of
Forestry.
> 
> https://www.fs.usda.gov/t-d/pubs/htmlpubs/htm04232822/page04.htm
> 
> Kirk in Half Moon Bay, CA, who also has their axe sharpening manual somewhere.
> 
> On Tue, Jun 18, 2024 at 11:44 AM Richard Wilson mailto:yorkshireman@y...>> wrote:
> 
> 
> The Great American though, presents 3 working teeth to the cut at a time, and
I scratched my head a good bit before deciding that I would treat each pair of 3
point teeth as a set - so, the two outer teeth are rakers - as above, and each
inner point is sharpened alternately left or right.  A bit over the top if
crosscutting, but given that a raker is kind go trying to be a rip tooth,
effective for ripping.
> 



-- 
Yorkshireman Galoot
in the most northerly county, farther north even than Yorkshire
IT #300

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