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278504 cvc95@c... 2024‑06‑17 Looking For Guidance on Starter Tool Recommendations.
Hello,

I am interested in starting to setup the hand tools needed for the construction
of small wooden boxes and other items.
In the construction of items, I will be planning to use dovetails, resawing
dimensional lumber, flattening and squaring by hand.
I would also intend on using rabbit and dados, of which I would want to achieve
by hand planes.

I look forward to hearing back.

Thank You,
278506 the_tinker <tinker@z...> 2024‑06‑17 Re: Looking For Guidance on Starter Tool Recommendations.
Ok. are you going to work in the 18th or the 19th century? In other words, pre
or post industrial revolution?

18th century? You need a complete set of wooden moulding planes.
19th? Stanley planes. 3-8 with a 45 complete and a few others to suit. They made
a ton.

Saws are pretty much the same across the span just construction improvements.
You will need some frame saws for re-sawing. Rip and crosscut. A selection of
back saws. A mitre box eventually.

That's a start. Sure others will chime in.

-JP

On 6/16/24 23:03, cvc95@c... wrote:

> 
> Hello,
> 
> I am interested in starting to setup the hand tools needed for the
> construction of small wooden boxes and other items.
> In the construction of
> items, I will be planning to use dovetails, resawing dimensional lumber,
> flattening and squaring by hand.
> I would also intend on using rabbit and
> dados, of which I would want to achieve by hand planes.
> 
> I look forward to
> hearing back.
> 
> Thank You,
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 

-- 
John Pesut
Boardman, Ohio
278509 Kirk Eppler 2024‑06‑17 Re: [Sender Not Verified] Re: Looking For Guidance on Starter Tool Recommendations.
How fancy will said boxes be, for what purpose.  How fancy?  Jewelry boxes,
cigar boxes, or just boxes to hold garage crap.  Personally, I don't stick
to pre or post industrial revolution, I skip back and forth, metal bench
planes, but a series of wooden rabbet planes.  Couple of chisels, and a
drill or two if you are using hinges.  So many options, once we have more
details on what exactly you want to do.

Kirk in Half Moon Bay, CA

On Mon, Jun 17, 2024 at 5:34 AM the_tinker  wrote:

> Ok. are you going to work in the 18th or the 19th century? In other words,
> pre or post industrial revolution?
>
> 18th century? You need a complete set of wooden moulding planes.
> 19th? Stanley planes. 3-8 with a 45 complete and a few others to suit.
> They made a ton.
>
> Saws are pretty much the same across the span just construction
> improvements. You will need some frame saws for re-sawing. Rip and
> crosscut. A selection of back saws. A mitre box eventually.
>
> That's a start. Sure others will chime in.
>
> -JP
>
> On 6/16/24 23:03, cvc95@c... wrote:
>
> >
> > Hello,
> >
> > I am interested in starting to setup the hand tools needed for the
> > construction of small wooden boxes and other items.
> > In the construction of
> > items, I will be planning to use dovetails, resawing dimensional lumber,
> > flattening and squaring by hand.
> > I would also intend on using rabbit and
> > dados, of which I would want to achieve by hand planes.
>
>


-- 
Kirk Eppler in Half Moon Bay, CA 
278510 Kenneth Stagg <kenneth.stagg@g...> 2024‑06‑17 Re: Looking For Guidance on Starter Tool Recommendations.
If you're dimensioning material you'll probably want a scrub plane for
hogging off excess. Maybe a jointer, depending upon what size material
you're working with (maybe you're working with larger pieces before cutting
them down for the boxes, for example.)

I have a scrub and a couple of jointers that are your's for shipping (along
with a #5 1/2 he-man jack, a #6 foreplane and a #4 1/2 oversized smoother.)

-Ken, still divesting of the last of his tools in Port Townsend

On Sun, Jun 16, 2024 at 8:09 PM cvc95 via groups.io  wrote:
278512 the_tinker <tinker@z...> 2024‑06‑17 Re: Looking For Guidance on Starter Tool Recommendations.
I have a 4-1/2 heavy (made during WWII) with a Hock iron. It is a plane like no
other.
I have wood working friends that will borrow it even though they have 10 planes
that will do
the same thing. You definitely want a 4-1/2.

Chisels too. I forgot to mention chisels. You need a few high end chisels
especially for dovetailing. Don't
cut corners there.

-JP

On 6/17/24 14:41, Kenneth Stagg wrote:

> 
> If you're dimensioning material you'll probably want a scrub plane for
> hogging off excess. Maybe a jointer, depending upon what size material
> you're working with (maybe you're working with larger pieces before
> cutting
> them down for the boxes, for example.)
> 
> I have a scrub and a
> couple of jointers that are your's for shipping (along
> with a #5 1/2
> he-man jack, a #6 foreplane and a #4 1/2 oversized smoother.)
> 
> -Ken, still
> divesting of the last of his tools in Port Townsend
> 
> On Sun, Jun 16, 2024
> at 8:09 PM cvc95 via groups.io  comcast.net@g... > wrote:
> 
> 

--
John Pesut
Boardman, Ohio
278514 Don Schwartz <dks@t...> 2024‑06‑17 Re: Looking For Guidance on Starter Tool Recommendations.
Depending on your physique and the size of your hands, you might 
consider a No.3 smoother.

For dovetailing you'll want bevel-edge chisels,� thinner ones rather 
than thick.
DS

On 2024-06-16 9:03 p.m., cvc95 via groups.io wrote:
> Hello,
>
> I am interested in starting to setup the hand tools needed for the
construction of small wooden boxes and other items.
> In the construction of items, I will be planning to use dovetails, resawing
dimensional lumber, flattening and squaring by hand.
> I would also intend on using rabbit and dados, of which I would want to
achieve by hand planes.
>
> I look forward to hearing back.
>
> Thank You,
>
>
> 
>
>

-- 

\u201cThe days that make us happy make us wise.\u201d John Masefield

\u201cTo argue with a man who has renounced the use and authority of reason, 
and whose philosophy consists in holding humanity in contempt, is like 
administering medicine to the dead, or endeavoring to convert an atheist 
by scripture.\u201d \u2015 Thomas Paine, The American Crisis
278516 Mike Rock <mikerock@m...> 2024‑06‑17 Re: Looking For Guidance on Starter Tool Recommendations.
Pun intended??
278517 the_tinker <tinker@z...> 2024‑06‑17 Re: Looking For Guidance on Starter Tool Recommendations.
;-)

On 6/17/24 17:08, Mike Rock wrote:

> 
> Pun intended??
> 
> On 6/17/2024 2:19 PM, the_tinker wrote:
> 
>> chisels especially for dovetailing. Don't cut corners there.
>> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 

-- 
John Pesut
Boardman, Ohio
278518 Stu Farnham <stu.farnham@g...> 2024‑06‑17 Re: Looking For Guidance on Starter Tool Recommendations.
Many of us (I’m looking at you, Stu Farnham) bought way too many tools
before we knew what we really needed and would use.  It’d an expensive
disease and often incurable except by poverty or a strict wife. My advice
below is intended to point you at enough to get you started and let you
grow in whichever direction you prefer as you progress.

Rather than jump in with a number of planes I would start with one that can
do a decent job of most things and expand as you gain experience.

The Stanley #5 is called a jack (as in jack-of-all-trades) plane because
its size can let it serve as a jointer, a smoother, or a scrub depending on
how you grind and sharpen the blade and set up the plane.  Stanley made
more of these than any other plane, so they are easy to find and more
reasonably priced than some others. Start with one blade ground straight
with the corners knocked off. Move on to more heavily cambered blades for
stock removal once you have basic sharpening skills.

The  #5 1/2 is a slightly longer, wider, and heavier version of the smae
plane but I would recommend holding off on a 5 1/2 until you have enough
experience to know what you need next and what you like.

Another consideration if you are getting started is sharpening. You will
need a couple of stones and a sharpening jig to get you started, and can
decide which type of best suits you and whether you want to learn to hand
sharpen as you gain experience. I recommend starting with an inexpensive
two sided 400/1000 diamond stone like this one
<https://www.amazon.com/SATC-Diamond-Sharpening-Stones-Sharpener/dp/B07YZ57ZVZ/r
ef=sr_1_119?crid=3SXMPSB6VD78K&dib=eyJ2IjoiMSJ9.dk38S3p2IOF3gkmRD2AdC5vb_vTTNBsn
GRt-rc2Aa3iQmG-9jhx5vrL6-xHdzXpIRp90Na6ikjOFYdY-3tIolDWhIZ31ypoxvRhN3w8GmQWjm6h6
TGYtPX3xO1F89XakAkApyA7aVIpH3-pmHW221xRZdXrPn6oHS1kkXlhH1-htqpMBnAcnuMEKLO4Wo_Fb
tqe32WtcOBzu60z5KA3gUf5dOw2vPkxcD3cXEJoBYjD2GsYKZplS4GlQj8f7yEvqGewDdoKUQ8ZbIspE
BSsjWn-Ff9a4sk1Q4YCa__5wgew.2ZLxuUedsOlZLtYdyUOOr5uJjlCxzu1qlgiMFPtR7ag&dib_tag=
se&keywords=diamond+sharpening+stone+400%2F1000&qid=1718659322&sprefix=diamond+s
harpening+stone+400%2F1000%2Caps%2C136&sr=8-119>
from
Amazon and any one of the zillions of Eclipse-style sharpening jigs out
there like this one
<https://www.amazon.com/Honing-Sharpening-Sharpener-Chisels-Planers/dp/B0CNRT43T
S/ref=sr_1_67?crid=2KEIUCQH1BFP2&dib=eyJ2IjoiMSJ9.n7nXIc9N6VhZWTjPyy0X5HDShCrch0
HAMW9et3KAVPNq6fN-w3w9zIFhijpQH0lTV1k5CvfUJLC0Q3TitTVBdnxg52sTIzoBagoBQLbOW7NME9
3m22VzlrO9-hGMeRc06TsXRoSkWdtmsDZxTRj0n0Xp6XCJYHx0wNdcmpu5SFFORJNoCQFU_IvGdTnRXp
x5M7zY3YISHXq7olCKlCdR6s-X-A3FlP3a3WgevrBj6oN2zNIMOG0jycuD0dDXmJryO_NKrzI0RB4244
3hsEL6w9r3zEEH_3cvzsq_JnZ-8Bg.KfYDZ6-JTxLm2mu-p-oZXPWkgz6pBQJ2YN-oYaq6flo&dib_ta
g=se&keywords=sharpening+jig&qid=1718659715&sprefix=sharpening+jig%2Caps%2C126&s
r=8-67>.
Note that I have not used either or these and am only providing the like
for information.

The most important thing is to start small and decide and grow at your own
pace. Most wood workers have three opinions on any one topic and making
sense of them all when you are just starting out is impossible. The best
way to do anything is the way that suits YOU.  The above represents my best
advice and does not reflect my current preferences.

Hope this helps.


Stu

____________
Stu Farnham
Gilmanton, NH

From: Don Schwartz via groups.io 

Reply: dks@t...  
Date: June 17, 2024 at 16:14:33
To: oldtools@g...  
Subject:  Re: [oldtools] Looking For Guidance on Starter Tool
Recommendations.

Depending on your physique and the size of your hands, you might
consider a No.3 smoother.

For dovetailing you'll want bevel-edge chisels,  thinner ones rather
than thick.
DS

On 2024-06-16 9:03 p.m., cvc95 via groups.io wrote:
> Hello,
>
> I am interested in starting to setup the hand tools needed for the
construction of small wooden boxes and other items.
> In the construction of items, I will be planning to use dovetails,
resawing dimensional lumber, flattening and squaring by hand.
> I would also intend on using rabbit and dados, of which I would want to
achieve by hand planes.
>
> I look forward to hearing back.
>
> Thank You,
>
>
>
>
>

-- 

“The days that make us happy make us wise.” John Masefield

“To argue with a man who has renounced the use and authority of reason,
and whose philosophy consists in holding humanity in contempt, is like
administering medicine to the dead, or endeavoring to convert an atheist
by scripture.” ― Thomas Paine, The American Crisis
278522 Esther <galoot@e...> 2024‑06‑18 Re: Looking For Guidance on Starter Tool Recommendations.
On 2024-06-17 17:36, Stu Farnham wrote:
> Many of us (I’m looking at you, Stu Farnham) bought way too many tools
> before we knew what we really needed and would use.  It’d an expensive
> disease and often incurable except by poverty or a strict wife. My 
> advice
> below is intended to point you at enough to get you started and let you
> grow in whichever direction you prefer as you progress.
> 

Hear! Hear!

Although my advice is slightly different...  Chris Schwarz has a good 
book out that has the problem of being judged by its cover and that is 
the Anarchist's Tool Chest.  People react badly to the possessive in the 
title which he uses with a different meaning than first reaction, and 
while he does finally spend 100 or so pages telling you how to build a 
chest, and many people have shown off their versions and taken classes; 
the first nearly 400 pages are not the chest but what tools should go 
into it.  He uses himself as a flagrant example of the problem nobly 
confessed to by Stu above, and how he got out of it.  Also, IT IS FREE 
TO DOWNLOAD (as are about 4 others, check all the Chris as author 
titles).  Go to  
https://lostartpress.com/collections/books/products/the-anarchists-tool-chest 
and click where it says and it will pop up in a window; hit the download 
button.

The basic concept is once you decide you need for example a certain size 
plane, how to buy one good one and never buy another the same size/type. 
  He is agnostic new/used and owns both.  Also lists sources which won't 
be new to long time readers in this group.

I should perhaps mention the usual rules apply here, I send them money 
and they send me stuff, this is unsolicted praise.

Esther who actually bought the hardcopy when it was on sale before it 
became free.
278536 Richard Wilson <yorkshireman@y...> 2024‑06‑18 Re: Looking For Guidance on Starter Tool Recommendations.
Aah, sit back on a rocker as the Porch gets into full flow.  So much knowledge
and experience here to draw on.

So of course I’ll chip in with a bit of sawdust of my own. 

First thing to think of when creating a tool set from scratch is ‘what am I
making’ - and you already nailed that with ’small wooden boxes’

Basic tool set (there are some list way back in the archives - “if you could
only have 10 tools, what would you choose” type of thing.

Begin with being able to dimension the raw material - or maybe you buy stuff
already dimensioned if we’re talking small goods, otherwise
A rip saw, a cross cut saw, and a pair of tenon saws - one rip, one cut.
Square of appropriate size, marking knife, metal rule, tape measure
A 4 ½ bench plane (smoother, Jeff) and a No5 (jack plane, Jeff )   get a good
blade for the 4 ½.
At least one stone for sharpening - and learn well how to sharpen.  You might
look for an apprentice that uses man-made round wheels too.
A couple of bevel edge chisels at least - maybe a 1 inch, a 3/8 and a 1/8 for
those tiny places
Something like a Record 43 or alternative plane - maybe a 50 combination plough
and beading (combination plane, Jeff - works grooves and beads with different
cutters)

That would get you basic dovetail boxes  


Then you can consider adding tools for specialisms - like particular beads you
like, or widths of grooves.  Maybe you need something a bit bigger? Personally I
like the No6 bench plane - I like the heft, and a No7 for heft and length and
shooting.
Perhaps you work in difficult timber? A low angle plane - a block plane (lots to
choose from)   A couple of cabinet scrapers for finer finishing, and a
burnisher.


Principally though - learn to sharpen.  Most people don’t know what ’sharp’
really is, and they make something sharper than they were used to and stop
there.  It’s inspirational to visit a proper user and find that the level of
sharpness is a couple of levels above what you thought, and experience just how
much easier and more accurately a properly sharp chisel will trim a joint, or a
plane will take off a fine whisper to achieve that perfect fitting lid.

- and read.  ‘Old’ textbooks from the early 20th century aim to make a
journeyman from any school leaver and describe how to do stuff with hand tools.
Chris Schwarz has leant heavily on Hayward - as has the Mortice and Tenon (sp)
latest magazine reprinting.


You could visit me here, if’n I was a few thousand miles closer… 


Richard Wilson
yorkshireman Galoot in Northumbria



> On 17 Jun 2024, at 04:03, cvc95@c... wrote:
> 
> Hello,
> 
> I am interested in starting to setup the hand tools needed for the
construction of small wooden boxes and other items.
> In the construction of items, I will be planning to use dovetails, resawing
dimensional lumber, flattening and squaring by hand.
> I would also intend on using rabbit and dados, of which I would want to
achieve by hand planes.
> 
> I look forward to hearing back.
> 
> Thank You,
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 



-- 
Yorkshireman Galoot
in the most northerly county, farther north even than Yorkshire
IT #300
278562 scottg <scottg@s...> 2024‑06‑22 Re: Looking For Guidance on Starter Tool Recommendations.
Like most of us, I bought too many tools to be able to use them all.
I bought about 3 tons of tools, when really,
a ton and half of tools would have probably done, for a start. haahahaha

Always remember, they come after your projects.  Make a nice dresser and 
people will come. Tables, chairs, jewelry boxes, clocks.... Oh they will 
come.
And most projects will end up walking out the door.

But your tools? They leave those alone ;)
yours scott

-- 
*******************************
    Scott Grandstaff
    Box 409 Happy Camp, Ca  96039
    scottg@s...
    http://www.snowcrest.net/kitty/sgrandstaff/
    http://www.snowcrest.net/kitty/hpages/index.html
278563 Pete Bergstrom <petebergstrom@g...> 2024‑06‑23 Re: Looking For Guidance on Starter Tool Recommendations.
As several others have noted, it's really easy (and encouraged in this
group) to acquire more tools than really needed.

I've made larger boxes (i.e., tool cabinet sizes) and a year or two ago
decided to try to get decently good results.

For someone starting out, my recommendations are:

   - Saws
      - Rip both for cutting to width as well as resawing. Learn to sharpen
      this carefully and you can get good results. I prefer a Disston
style panel
      saw for big pieces and a Japanese style (Ryoba) for smaller, finer work.
      - Crosscut for cutting to length. I have panel saws for this, but
      have been getting very good results with little waste/rework
needed for the
      finer cuts.
   - Planes
      - I have a couple of excellent #5 size Stanley planes for edges. I
      haven't tended to plane surfaces much as I'm not very good at it
and don't
      have a solid workbench for use. There is some non-handtool work
here plus a
      lot of sanding.
      - Some sort of a plane for a shooting board. I have a #51 style plane
      from a long-ago Oldtools member's project to make a pattern and get
      castings, but I've seen Rob Cosman's preference for a #6 or so
Stanley type
      and would probably follow that next time around.
   - Chisels
      - You can overshoot and undershoot here really easily.
         - Cheap, commodity chisels (such as the ones from Stanley/big box
         store at the makerspace I belong to) are anti-productive.
Sharpening them
         feels like sharpening a block of rubber. Just don't bother.
         - I haven't tried new-make chisels which are supposed to be high
         quality (Lie-Nielsen, Barr, etc.).
      - I did just get a couple of the supposed-higher end Narex chisels at
      a sale last winter, put handles on and ground them to a skew profile. I
      still haven't used them for a full box, but the sharpening process felt
      like my preferred chisels.
      - Mid-age chisels (produced between 1900-ish and 1960s) are what I
      strongly prefer. When I lived in Minnesota, I had access to a lot of EA
      Berg/Gensco/Jernbolaget Swedish chisels and grew the preference. I have a
      lot of other chisels too, but with the exception of a big cluster of Buck
      Brothers, these are all mismatches and don't often get used.
      - Just find good steel, and make sure you have 1/2", 1/4" and
      hopefully 1/8" or 3/16" for the fine cleanout of joint details. I mostly
      use 1/2" and smaller for the boxes I like to make which are
under 1/2 cubic
      foot in volume.
      - Shooting board
      - Biggest jump forward I made was building this and putting it to
      use. Get your boards to match for width, length and square ends and edges
      and it'll make your box-making go so much better.
   - Dovetail marking/cutting jig. I like the Katz-Moses product. I'm still
   training my muscle memory to cut straight on these fine joints, and this
   really works for me.
   - Bevel gauge and square. Most any of these will do as long as they hold
   your position. I like to use the nicer ones I've collected over the years
   because of the way the surfaces feel, but my modern Stanley versions work
   just fine.
   - I bought a Stanley #50 to make grooves for the box bottoms, but to
   date have used means for this. Perhaps this winter I'll get around to it.
   - I find a router plane such as a Stanley 71 is really useful for some
   parts of jointing. I have an old one and added a set of blades from Lee
   Valley to make it more versatile. I've made a few small dado joints with it
   as well as doing some tenon cleanup.
   - I really haven't made anything significant with rabbets or dados, but
   figure I'll do something with a combination of #50 or one of the shoulder
   planes.

Here are a couple of projects from the past year:

   -
   https://petebergstrom.blogspot.com/2024/06/i-made-some-boxes-for-christmas-
gifts.html
   -
   https://petebergstrom.blogspot.com/2024/06/i-made-garage-for-my-edc-
stuff.html

Pete


On Sun, Jun 16, 2024 at 8:09 PM cvc95 via groups.io  wrote:
278564 the_tinker <tinker@z...> 2024‑06‑23 Re: Looking For Guidance on Starter Tool Recommendations.
I really like the garage. Great idea and execution. Well done.
Wasted a good Pennsylvania rifle stock though...

> 
>    -
>    https://petebergstrom.blogspot.com/2024/06/i-made-garage-for-my-edc-
stuff.html
> 
> 
> Pete
> 
> 
> On Sun, Jun 16, 2024 at 8:09 PM cvc95 via groups.io  comcast.net@g... > wrote:
> 
> 
> 

--
John Pesut
Boardman, Ohio
278565 leeburk@a... 2024‑06‑23 Re: Looking For Guidance on Starter Tool Recommendations.
I and my wife are now in our 80's and we are going to sell the house and move
into an apartment. That means I need to liquidate my shop and tools. That is
close to bringing me to tears but nothing is forever and I don't want to die and
have my tools pawed over by know-nothings.If anyone on the Porch has had
experience in this kind of thing please tell me how to sell these without super-
human effort and without giving them away. I should have started selling the
pieces one at a time on Ebay or on here years ago but I couldn't handle the
thought of life without tools. And I don't have the energy to do the one-at-a-
time thing now. Thank you.  (LeeBurk@a...)
278566 Bart Nadeau 2024‑06‑23 Re: Looking For Guidance on Starter Tool Recommendations.
I just went through this and can sympathize with you. I sold off a few of the
major items ( table saw, drill, press, etc.) on craigslist. I took a carload to
a local organizations tool show in half Moon Bay and sold off everything I
brought with me. Obviously this was at “I don’t want to take it home” prices and
not what it was really worth or what I thought it was really worth anyway. I got
talking to a tool dealer there and ultimately sold everything else in the
basement except for an adjustable bench and one or two other things to the tool
dealer then, when I was through putting other boxes of donations together, I
sold the bench on craigslist.  don’t be surprised that you were going to get a
lot less than what you paid for everything.
Anyway, now it’s all gone and I moved to a place with elevators and don’t have
to face that damn stairway at my house with my arthritic hip anymore.
No good solution is really available. Best to get rid of everything as quickly
as you can and not have it hanging over your head.
Best wishes
Bart
278567 leeburk@a... 2024‑06‑23 Re: Looking For Guidance on Starter Tool Recommendations.
Thanks Bart and Joshua. Misery loves company so thanks for your brotherly
"love". Life does go on "tool-less" I would suppose although I don't know what I
am going to do with myself.
    On Sunday, June 23, 2024 at 05:31:51 PM CDT, Bart Nadeau 
wrote:

 I just went through this and can sympathize with you. I sold off a few of the
major items ( table saw, drill, press, etc.) on craigslist. I took a carload to
a local organizations tool show in half Moon Bay and sold off everything I
brought with me. Obviously this was at “I don’t want to take it home” prices and
not what it was really worth or what I thought it was really worth anyway. I got
talking to a tool dealer there and ultimately sold everything else in the
basement except for an adjustable bench and one or two other things to the tool
dealer then, when I was through putting other boxes of donations together, I
sold the bench on craigslist.  don’t be surprised that you were going to get a
lot less than what you paid for everything.
Anyway, now it’s all gone and I moved to a place with elevators and don’t have
to face that damn stairway at my house with my arthritic hip anymore.
No good solution is really available. Best to get rid of everything as quickly
as you can and not have it hanging over your head.
Best wishes
Bart 
> On Jun 23, 2024, at 2:50 PM, leeburk@a... via groups.io 
wrote:
> 
> I and my wife are now in our 80's and we are going to sell the house and move
into an apartment. That means I need to liquidate my shop and tools. That is
close to bringing me to tears but nothing is forever and I don't want to die and
have my tools pawed over by know-nothings.If anyone on the Porch has had
experience in this kind of thing please tell me how to sell these without super-
human effort and without giving them away. I should have started selling the
pieces one at a time on Ebay or on here years ago but I couldn't handle the
thought of life without tools. And I don't have the energy to do the one-at-a-
time thing now. Thank you.  (LeeBurk@a...)
> 
> 
> 
> 
>
278569 Kenneth Stagg <kenneth.stagg@g...> 2024‑06‑23 Re: Looking For Guidance on Starter Tool Recommendations.
When I decided to divest I tested the waters via Craigslist, and, yeah – at
least locally you're not going to get what you paid. I decided that was OK,
though. I made enough to buy my new trainer for the bike and my new iPad
Air, but beyond that I decided the tools were never meant an investment for
me – the acquisition, hoarding and playing with them were payment enough.
I'm sure I paid more than $10,000 for all of them and got a little more
than $1,600, but some people who couldn't have afforded them at full price
get to enjoy and use them, so I'm happy with the price.

-Ken

On Sun, Jun 23, 2024 at 3:31 PM Bart Nadeau via groups.io  wrote:
... don’t be surprised that you were going to get a lot less than what you
paid for everything.
278570 Chuck Taylor 2024‑06‑24 Re: Looking For Guidance on Starter Tool Recommendations.
Lee wrote:

> I and my wife are now in our 80's and we are going to sell the 
> house and move into an apartment. That means I need to liquidate 
> my shop and tools. 

Where do you live? Is there a local tool club in the area? Maybe PNTC or MWTCA?
When it's time for me to divest, that's where I plan to start.

Good luck!

Chuck Taylor
north of Seattle
278571 Curt Seeliger <seeligerc@g...> 2024‑06‑24 Re: Looking For Guidance on Starter Tool Recommendations.
Several people have responded with their thoughts and experiences with tool
dispersal. It would also be interesting to hear how people have navigated
the associated changes  -- changes in living spaces, changes in meaning,
changes in activities, yada. I'm asking for a friend.
cur - "Huh. That iceberg is way closer than it used to be."

On Sun, Jun 23, 2024 at 4:48 PM Kenneth Stagg via groups.io  wrote:
278572 the_tinker <tinker@z...> 2024‑06‑24 Re: Looking For Guidance on Starter Tool Recommendations.
When the time comes I'm going to think back to when I started and how much I
appreciated
the help I got along the way.

When I was starting out woodworking I had a friend doing the same thing. He
answered an ad
in the paper for a full set of wooden moulding planes plus a few dozen other
fenced wooden planes.

The oldtimer wanted market price for his stuff. My friend couldn't come close
but enjoyed talking with
the gent and drooling over his shop. Planes, saws, chisels and everything in
between.

A few days later the guy called him back and asked "What would you do with my
tools if you could afford them?"

My friend told him "I'll use them. First thing I'm going to make is a copy of an
early American corner cupboard my wife saw
at Greenfield Village"

The gent said "I can't bear the thought of my saws painted and my planes turned
into table lamps. Give me 400 bucks
and you can have it all".

I helped him sort boxes of stuff afterwards. There was a Sandusky center wheel
plow plane in there. He still uses it.

-JP

On 6/24/24 00:37, Curt Seeliger wrote:

> 
> Several people have responded with their thoughts and experiences with
> tool
> dispersal. It would also be interesting to hear how people have
> navigated
> the associated changes  -- changes in living spaces, changes in
> meaning,
> changes in activities, yada. I'm asking for a friend.
> cur - "Huh.
> That iceberg is way closer than it used to be."
> 
> On Sun, Jun 23, 2024 at
> 4:48 PM Kenneth Stagg via groups.io  gmail.com@g... > wrote:
> 
> 
> 

--
John Pesut
Boardman, Ohio
278573 Bridger Berdel <bridgerberdel@g...> 2024‑06‑24 Re: Looking For Guidance on Starter Tool Recommendations.
When I was 17 a friend of my dad's dropped off for me a box of planes. They
taught me a lot.

On Mon, Jun 24, 2024, 5:38 AM the_tinker via groups.io  wrote:
278574 Mark van Roojen <mvr1@e...> 2024‑06‑24 Re: Looking For Guidance on Starter Tool Recommendations.
MWTCA has a service for the spouses of deceased members to help them dispose of
tools.  You might contact them for advice.  Or one of the reputable tool dealers
you know from the list - Pat Leach comes to mind, but there are others around
the country.

Another option might be renting a booth in an antique mall.  I have a case in
one I rent for $20/month and the business takes 10% of my sales proceeds and
charges credit card fees and collects sales tax.  Generally you still have to
file a sales tax return every year, but if they collect the taxes there are ways
to properly fill out the return so that it reflects the fact that the tax was
collected by the Antiques Mall.

Best of luck with that.  I'm not doing much tool accumulating any more, but I
hope it will be a while before I am motivated to get rid of stuff.  I just had
my basement rebuilt a couple of years back to get space for the metal working
tools.

-Mark

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